The Pfizer Vaccine and Me

Nick Name

Administrator
USA team member
I put it off for a long time but finally decided to get the COVID vaccine. I would have preferred the J&J but that wasn't available locally, my choices were Moderna or Pfizer. I decided on Pfizer, based on extensive (roughly 2 minutes of Google :LOL:) research and the pharmacy I chose. Due to my unusual work schedule and some other factors I went to Walgreens.

I didn't have any problems with the first shot, but I did have a reaction to the 2nd. Basically, I felt like I had a bad 24 hour flu, with the worst symptoms kicking in 18-24 hours later. I had nausea, joint aches, fatigue, and surprisingly a lot of sinus drainage. I never felt like I had a fever but I did have the chills and hot flashes too. All these were listed as possible effects of the shot so I'm confident I didn't actually have the flu or something else. I had the 2nd shot exactly 3 weeks after the first one, and if I were to do it over I would wait at least a couple more weeks to get the 2nd one. My advice to anyone who's going to get Pfizered or still needs the 2nd shot is to wait a bit longer than 3 weeks. Also, don't plan on going to work or doing any physical activity within 24 hours of the 2nd or you're going to have a bad time. :oops:

BTW, my father got vaccinated at Rite Aide and I was not happy with their service. I was satisfied with Walgreens but all of these pharmacies need to hire more help. I guess that's true for a lot of businesses these days. My experience with both was that scheduling an appointment online means nothing, in terms of how fast - or not - you are taken care of.
 

Vester

Well-Known Member
USA team member
I had my second Pfizer shot on 6 January, 2021 exactly two weeks after the first shot. I had no reaction at all, but that is because my immune system (age 78) was NOT as good as yours. Your reaction to the second shot meant that you had a level of immunity that I did not have. I had an antibody test in July, and I have a good level of COVID-19 antibodies.

I go with the statistics. A much smaller percentage of people die of COVID-19 if they have been vaccinated.
 

supdood

Well-Known Member
USA team member
I had a similar reaction to the second dose but am glad to have produces those antibodies. I'm also glad that more folks are getting vaccinated now--I hate that this has become a political/cultural issue when the science, as Vester points out, is absolutely clear: getting vaccinated saves lives.
 

Nick Name

Administrator
USA team member
The stats seem to be pretty clear that vaccines protect the population. The problem is if you happen to suffer the worst effects of the vaccine, heart problems or blood clots etc., those risks are borne individually. The fact that those risks are small, statistically speaking, is small comfort if you're an outlier. I'm not in favor of mandated vaccination partly for this reason.

I just reached a point where I felt the risks of not being vaccinated outweighed the other. I think it's a little bizarre that it seems to be more of a political decision than a health decision for a lot of people.
 
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