my server rack

jebadia

Member
i just bought 2 dl-380-g6 servers for a total of 3 hp servers in going to be running ubuntu linux server 16.04 they have good deals on amazon if you search used servers dell and hp servers from 140 dollars to 300 dollars make great boinc machines i highly recomend them if you want to boost your daily crunch total also upgrade the ram :)
 
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jebadia

Member
https://h20195.www2.hpe.com/v2/getdocument.aspx?docname=c04282582 server specsits a hp proliant dl 380 g6 with 16 gigs ram needs ram upgrade 1.2tb 8 10k sas hot swap drives dual xeon intel 2.5 the other 2 i just bought are
HP Proliant DL380 G6 Two Quad Core E5540 2.53GHz 24GB RAM P410i 2X72GB



    • P ProLiant DL380 G6 16B Server
    • 2x 2.53GHz Intel Xeon Quad-Core E5540
    • 24GB RAM / 2x 73GB 10K SAS Hard Drives
    • P410i w/ 256MB
    • No Operating Syste
 

doneske

Well-Known Member
USA team member
Those are 2U systems. Those systems also have the older PCIe 2.0 slots which means an older GPU. Then, if you are running Linux, you have to get the drivers and compute capabilities working. The easiest way would be to download and install the GPU Vendor's proprietary driver but then it will "hook" into the kernel using the DKMS facility. Problem I found was it created a few minor problems with future maintenance to the kernel. I'm running 8 of the older IBM 3650 systems and 2 HP DL360 Gen 8 1U servers. These systems are cheap because they are older technology so don't support the newer functions and hardware. Most of the newer video cards will require PCIe 3.0 at a minimum. When I was "considering" GPU for some of my servers, I found that I would, most likely, have to order a PCI riser card and then the video card itself as the video card will have to be installed horizontally in order to fit in the chassis. That is when I stopped considering it so I didn't continue to research it. There may have been additional BIOS updates that might have been needed later. It would probably be difficult to get BIOS updates as the servers are most likely no longer supported and even if they were, you would probably need a maintenance contract with the vendor to get access to the updates. When I started running servers, I found out that it didn't take to many before I overloaded the wall outlet. Also, I found out that electrical code says you can only use 80% of the circuit rating when running 24 x 7 which means you shouldn't exceed 10 amps on a 15 amp circuit. Each system running 100% busy will use approx 2.2 amps at 120 volts (if you add a GPU, it will be more). I had my son-in-law, who is an electrician, install 2 20 amp circuits in my study (computer room). 30 days later, I found out you have to pay for all that power. :eek: Then I ran into cooling problems...
 

Nick Name

Administrator
USA team member
3.0 cards are backwards-compatible with 2.0 slots. My Pascal cards in #1 are in 2.0 slots and work fine, although I'm sure they're handicapped a bit. I looked briefly through the manual and wondered what a riser was. :confused:
 

doneske

Well-Known Member
USA team member
That's good information to know... I didn't have any cards to test with and was going off the cards requirements information. However, me being the cheap person that I am, it would upset me to pay top dollar for a later card and then not be able to get full value out of it. Another reason I decided against it was the cooling issue. My servers already run pretty hot and if I added a GPU that would just add to the heat generation and also restrict air flow through the chassis a bit. Being only 2u in size didn't leave a lot of room to spare. I originally thought it might be best to use a workstation type compute card (designed more for computing and less for graphics presentation) like the AMD Polaris. I assumed they were sort of designed to be used in a server type environment instead of a standard PC type configuration but they are a little pricey...
 
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